Yemeni pancakes with savoury stuff and yoghurt sauce.

Photo by Savannah van der Niet

Photo by Savannah van der Niet

I really wanted to do some kind of savoury pancake, but I didn't want it to be boring. Enter, this recipe I found in the Honey & Co cookbook. They serve there's with a great kind of herby-paste, but I decided to go real Australian Bastardising Other Cultures Breakfast and serve mine with halloumi, asparagus, smoked salmon and yoghurt and herb sauce.  

Makes about 15 pancakes

Pancake ingredients: 
500g wholemeal plain flour
1 1/2 stale pita bread
2 teaspoons dried yeast
Pinch of salt
Pinch of sugar
700ml water


1 packet of halloumi, sliced thick of thin depending on what you like
20-ish asparagus spears
500g smoked salmon

Yoghurt Sauce Ingredients: 
200g Greek yoghurt
1/2 cup chopped coriander
1/2 cup chopped mint
Handful of dill leaves
Pepper
Splash of olive Oil
Juice of 1 lemon

 

Soak the pita bread in water for about 10-15 minutes until soft. Mush it up into a paste with your hands or a fork. Mix the pita bread and the rest of the pancake ingredients together, cover with gladwrap and leave in a warm area for at least 30 minutes, until the yeast has activated and the mixture gets bubbly.

Lightly toss the asparagus with oil, and roast at 180 degrees for 10 minutes

Heat a light layer of oil in a medium frypan. Spoon a ladle full of mixture and spread it out into a thin pancake. Cook until the top is covered with bubbles. Don't flip the pancake, instead put a lid or plate on top of the frypan for 1-2 minutes, until the top is steamed cooked and not wet to touch.

You can keep the pancakes on a plate covered with a tea-towel while you fry up the halloumi. 

Mix all the yoghurt sauce ingredients together. 

Serve the pancakes on a plate with smoked salmon, asparagus and halloumi, with the yoghurt sauce in a bowl so everyone can put their own pancakes together. 

Photo by Savannah van der Niet

Photo by Savannah van der Niet

(Shoulda been) Soba Salad

If you look closely (or like, at all), you’ll notice that the noodles in these salads are definitely NOT soba. One is vermicelli (fine, gotta cater for my legit celiac friend Laurel) and one is Udon. NOT FINE. Udon noodles are great in soups or stir fries because they’re substantial and salty – not at all right for ‘delicate’ (as close as I ever get anyway) salads.

But when you’re rushing around the supermarket trying to get ready to feed 20 people, it’s very easy to pick up the wrong packet – and then what was I gonna do, walk back to the shops? In the middle of the day in summer? Nah. But please don’t make the same mistakes as me. For the love of god get the soba.

You could also definitely make your own sesame sauce (I’ve made one before with mirin, light soy, a little sugar and tahini that was pretty good) but the ready-made stuff is generally a much better consistency. It’d be worth going to a Japanese grocer to get the real deal (Genki Mart in Alderly is terrific if you’re in Brisbane) but the Kewpie brand one is available in most supermarkets.

Serves 12 + as a side

Ingredients:
2 packets soba noodles
4 shallots, finely sliced
2 Lebanese cucumbers
1 packet tomato medley (if the multi-coloured tomatoes aren't in season regular cherry tomatoes are fine)
Sesame-soy sauce (see above)
1 Carrot
2 Tablespoons sesame seeds
Couple of handfuls of mixed lettuce leaves
thumb-sized peices of ginger
500g raw salmon fillets (should be about 2 - 3 fillets) 

Wrap the salmon fillets individually in baking paper with the ginger, a splash of soy sauce and half a teaspoon of butter for each fillet. Cook at 180 degrees for 5 - 10 minutes, until the salmon is just cooked. Leave to cool.

Cook the soba noodles in boiling water for 2-3 minutes. Leave to cool completely. 

Cut the carrots into matchstick-sized 'julienne' pieces (you can grate them if you want, though it tastes different). Slice the cucumber in 1-2cm slices, then cut them in half into semi-circles. Cut the tomatoes in half (or smaller if you're using big tomatoes. 

Mix the cucumber, carrot, tomatoes, lettuce, shallots, soba, sesame seeds, and the sesame dressing of your choice together. Flake the cooked salmon over the top and serve.  

Dill and mustard cured salmon

1kg Salmon fillet
1 1/2 tablespoons mustard seeds
1/2 cup of fresh dill,
pulled off the stems
120g caster sugar
80g table salt

Go to your local seafood shop and say 'hello, I'd like a fillet of salmon, skin on, costing approx *this much* money'. The fillet I got was $60 because I just said 'give me a big-ish' peice and then couldn't back out once I knew the price. It fed ten people well and was really delicious though so  ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

Get half a cup of caster sugar and one third of a cup of table salt and mix them together. Fry your mustard seeds until they start to pop, then crush them with a mortar and pestle/give them a go in the food processor (you don't technically need to do this, they're fine whole). Cut up your dill, make sure it's very dry if you washed it first, and mix it with the salt, sugar and mustard seeds.

Lay your salmon, skin-side down on a big piece of cling wrap (at least twice the size of the salmon. Pat your salt, sugar and herb mixture over the top, making sure it's fully covered. Wrap the salmon up in the gladwrap, and chuck it in the fridge weighed down with a couple of plates. Leave it for 2-3 days, turning it over at least twice in that time.

Slice it thinly on a diagonal, and serve with sour cream on little toasts with some cracked pepper, or just drop thin slices into your mouth whole while lying shirtless on the couch watching SVU**

**serving suggestion